One Long Sunday – Short Story

The fan moved the still air, around the bunker. Since the crash of 2025, air had become a precious commodity. The irony of the wind generator running the fan in the bunker to circulate the stale air wasn’t wasted on Harper. The problem was the air that turned the wind turbine wasn’t worth breathing. Since the world had destroyed itself, the atmosphere contained chemicals. Chemicals that even the most robust living organism couldn’t survive. Still, the filtration machine cleaned the air and the fan circulated it throughout. The air smelt stale and it was always hot, but breathing it couldn’t kill you.

Tommy’s Dog – Short Story

Part Three of Tommy’s Life Tommy sniffed the sweet sea air. He loved how fresh everything smelt on the beach. He licked his lips and tasted the salt. The small dog he had recently rescued from the shelter, ran by his side. Everyone stopped to talk to the guy with the cute dog. The wind blew the sand around his feet as he took another deep breath. The first relaxing breath he had been able to take for two weeks. Ever since he had been stopped in the subway by the policeman, after the Facebook challenge. His act of pretending to be the first aider, whilst killing his victims was over. This time Tommy had managed to escape the suspicions of the police. He knew he would not be that lucky next time. One more incident of Tommy being found at a murder scene and his mission would be over for good.

An Abandoned Beauty – Short Story

Rose threw her legs out of the bed for the fifth time in one night. The baby wouldn’t sleep for more than 45 minutes. As soon as Rose drifted off she was woken again by the screams. Rose had never felt tiredness like it. There were times during the last couple of weeks where she has started hallucinating. It was only a bum change this time. Rose remembered how her mother had mocked her when she said she was using traditional nappies. She had risen her eyebrows and chuckled.

Sharing – Flash Fiction

It was an easy decision when Marion asked me for my kidney. At the time when I went through the initial tests, I was shocked I could even be considered a match. Then against all odds, I was the only person who could save Marion’s life. We had grown up together, sisters from a different mother we used to say. We had met when we were only five on our first day at school. We were as different as chalk and cheese. Marion came from a rich family, everything she wanted her parents provided for her. The latest bikes, the latest toys and even one of the first computers.